Research skills to develop own learning 

When I was researching historical and social context of my painting( La Place Clichy , Pierre Auguste Renoir) I have learned that the work in terms of composition is inspired by the Japanese Printmaking , particulary in the style rising perspective of the street . And also I have learned that Japanese prints  were at that time very popular after its success at the World Exhibition of 1867. Further more I have get to know that Renoir was a great admirer of Katsushika Hokusai. After  I read this information , I have researched  this artist.

He is Japanese master artist and printmaker of the ukiyo-e (“pictures of the floating world”) school. His early works represent the full spectrum of ukiyo-e art, including single-sheet prints of landscapes and actors, hand paintings, and surimono (“printed things”), such as greetings and announcements. Later he concentrated on the classical themes of the samurai and Chinese subjects. His famous print series “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji,” published between 1826 and 1833, marked the summit in the history of the Japanese landscape print. ( from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hokusai )

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Hokusai had a long career, but he produced most of his important work after age 60. His most popular work is the ukiyo-e series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji, which was created between 1826 and 1833. It actually consists of 46 prints (10 of them added after publication). In addition, he is responsible for the 1834 One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji (富嶽百景 Fugaku Hyakkei), a work which “is generally considered the masterpiece among his landscape picture books.” His ukiyo-e transformed the art form from a style of portraiture focused on the courtesans and actors popular during the Edo Period in Japan’s cities into a much broader style of art that focused on landscapes, plants, and animals. ( from http://www.katsushikahokusai.org/biography.html )

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